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Maintaining Momentum
Your efficient organization of pupils, hardware, and software will reduce interruptions and increase the amount of time on task. Below are tips for establishing and maintaining the momentum of ETE modules.

Organize Your Classroom and Materials
Arrange the Room Appropriately: Members of a team should sit close enough to communicate without disrupting the other teams. All students should be visible to the teacher. Leave plenty of room around student desks so that you can easily walk around and monitor students' interactions. High traffic areas such as the pencil sharpener and doorways should be kept free of congestion.

Distribute Materials Appropriately: Materials should be distributed in such a way that students understand that the assignment requires a joint effort. Materials useful to all should be readily accessible to all.

Specify a Time Frame for Each Task
When communicating expectations to students, it's a good idea to tell them how much time they have to produce a product or to practice a skill. Shorter is better than longer because a short time encourages students to start promptly and move smartly. Give students reasonable time to complete project tasks, but don't make the mistake of allowing too much time, because many students will then develop the habit of dawdling over their work
(Harmin, 1994).

Have Students Write Progress Reports
ETE student teams work on tasks for an extended time to produce a tangible product. The hardest part for you will be giving up control and trusting your students to grow into the challenges. The best part will be seeing students become energetic and responsible as they work on the modules. Having students write progress reports is a good way to reassure yourself that progress is being made. Request a weekly report of what the students have accomplished and what specific plans they have for the following week. Each student could submit this information every Friday, or team members could rotate the job of reporting for the team.

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References
Harmin, M. (1994), Inspiring active learning: a handbook for teachers. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

 

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Last updated April 28, 2005
   

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