Skip Navigation

Button that takes you back to the home page. Button that takes you to the teacher pages. Button that takes you to the modules and activities page. Button that takes you to the glossary page. Button that takes you to the related links page. Button that takes you to the references page. Button that takes you to the Problem Based Learning model page. Image map of some Global Climate Change puzzle pieces.  Please have someone assist you with this.

Button that takes you to the Overview page.
Button that takes you to the Temperature page.
Image that says Precipitation.
Button that takes you to the Plants page.

Image of Earth System Science Education Alliance logo that links to the Earth System Science page.

 

Image of Earth's Spheres logo that links to the Earth's Spheres page.

 

Carbon Dioxide: Precipitation
The effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on precipitation patterns are a result of the effects of CO2 on average air temperature. Carbon dioxide cause the earth's average air temperature to increase. Higher temperatures cause particles in the earth's atmosphere to move faster. This creates more energy in the earth's atmosphere. The energy causes air and water to move around the planet. The result can be as simple as a slight breeze or as complex as the formation of a hurricane. The greater the amount of energy in the atmosphere, the more severe the weather. There is evidence of increased energy in the atmosphere over the United States, where the occurrence of severe weather has been increasing over the past century.

Image of a map showing precipitation trends across the United States from 1900 to the present.  Please have someone assist you with this.In addition to increasing the energy in the atmosphere--and thus increasing the intensity of weather events-- elevated temperatures can cause increased evaporation from the earth's surface. This may lead to declines in the amount of precipitation at lower latitudes and increases in the amount of precipitation at higher latitudes. At lower latitudes, the temperature would be warmest. There would be much evaporation from these regions. The highly energized air would then carry the water vapor to higher latitudes. The excess water would eventually fall out as increased precipitation over these regions.  Over the past century, this trend has been observed. Although precipitation has increased globally by about 1% in the past century, the amount of precipitation in tropical areas has declined. At the same time, there has been nearly a 5% net increase in precipitation across the United States.  Precipitation trends across the United States for the past 100 years can be seen in the figure above. Image: Precipitation trends across the United States from 1900 to the present. Figure courtesy of the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Overview ..|.. Temperature ..|.. Precipitation ..|.. Plants
Glossary
..|.. Related Links ..|.. References  |.. PBL Model

Home ..|.. Teacher Pages ..|.. Modules & Activities

Button that takes you back to the Global Climate Change main page.

HTML code by Chris Kreger
Maintained by ETE Team
Last updated November 10, 2004

Some images 2004 www.clipart.com

Privacy Statement and Copyright 1997-2004 by Wheeling Jesuit University/NASA-supported Classroom of the Future. All rights reserved.

Center for Educational Technologies, Circuit Board/Apple graphic logo, and COTF Classroom of the Future logo are registered trademarks of Wheeling Jesuit University.