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Diversity: Northern Spotted Owl
Owl locations are found by setting up study areas of around 100 square miles. Three hundred call stations, uniformly distributed, are established at each of the two study areas. The stations are visited at night a minimum of six times a year. Once areas have been established, the identity of the owls is ascertained as single owls or pairs. This determination is made during the day by calling the owl and feeding it mice. If the owls are nesting, the female will stay at the nest, while the male answers the call. The male will then bring the mouse back to the nest. The owl can be followed back to the nest where subsequent capture and banding takes place. Colored and numbered bands are used to track the birds' movement. The nest is watched until the young leave. By tracking the owls and monitoring the nesting success of each pair, it can be determined if they are sustaining an intrinsic rate of population growth. In other words, a conclusion is reached as to whether or not the owls can remain happy and healthy enough to sustain their population in these habitats.

Once the demographic characteristics are documented, the owl pairs showing the best reproduction ability will participate in a radio telemetry study. This stage, which will be carried on for at least twelve months, enables specific habitat conditions such as the kind of stand types [types of trees] the owls use for nesting, roosting and foraging to be determined. Nicolet, J. (1995, January-February). Providing for northern spotted owls in managed forest environment. Forest Log, 64, p. 7. The Oregon Department of Forestry- Public Affairs

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